Lake Painting

Monday, April 27, 2015 — Gentle Spring this Week, Summer next Week!

Our (mostly) gentle spring may end by the weekend and turn into summer next week–hopefully a gentle start to summer, but who knows!

Potted Fruit trees for sale: Dwarf Apples (including Honeycrisp, Jonagold, Liberty, Gala, and Jonafree), Early Red Haven peaches, Blueberry bushes (1 and 2 year olds), Red Raspberries, Seedless Grapes, Rhubarb, Ever-bearing Strawberries, and Onions. ALSO, perennial flowers: hollyhocks, coral bells, groundcovers (including periwinkle, sedum, stonecrop, sempervivum), and more. Many more vegetable and flower plants are coming so check back often! Tree protectors and deer repellent soap also available! PLEASE CALL AHEAD or email to schedule a pickup. 231-303-0412, farmgirl@tasteofsunsugar.com, Magicland Farms 4380 S. Gordon, Fremont, MI 49412

The following are available for immediate pickup at our stand:

Potted Pawpaw, Redbud and White Pine trees. Mixed eating and baking apples, yellow onions for sale at $2.50 for a 1/4 peck (about 3 pounds) and our red potatoes for $3 a half peck (about 7 pounds)

Saturday, April 25, 2015 — Gentle Spring Has returned, but for how long?

Our gentle spring weather has again made  welcome its appearance although this morning might be a tad cloudy.  Starting tomorrow we will have nice sunny weather and temperatures — get this — near normal, which means it will start out for a high of about 60F on Monday and slowly, slowly rise to the mid 60s, with sun, by next weekend.  Then things looks like they will change from a gentle spring to an early start to summer with temperatures pushiing close to 80F.  Hopefully, all this will occur without severe weather, and that’s what it looks like right now but things can quickly change when heat arrives.

Today we now have added potted White Pine to the Pawpaw and Redbud trees we had available at our stand yesterday.

The Eastern White Pine, isn’t only a prized tree for lumber, its delicate, soft green, graceful foliage is unsurpassed by that of any other hardy northern tree except possibly the hemlock.  In the fall it drops its three-year-old needles like many other evergreens, but the foliage that remains stays a soft green all winter.  In fact, the normal green of White Pine foliage year in and year out make this tree one of the most valuable for background foliage in any landscape planting, be it large or small

We are low on our supply of apples although we have a fair supply of Fuji,  We also have a fair supply of mixed eating and baking varieties. We also have our yellow onions for sale at $2.50 for a 1/4 peck (about 3 pounds) and our red potatoes for $3 a half peck (about 7 pounds)

Friday, April 24, 2015 — Beautiful spring weather is again returning!

Sunny April Day

Beautiful sunny day today!!!

That nasty closed upper air low pressure area finally decided to move on out which has allowed milder, drier air we were experiencing before the upper air low pressure paid its unwelcome visit, to return. Except for that unwelcome closed upper air low guest, this April has been one of the gentlest I ever remember — a gradual, but steady change from the bitter cold of winter to the heat of summer.  It looks like the gentle spring is now returning!!!  While there has been a lack of precipitation falling from the sky, when it happens in April, it does have its good points.  Lets hope it doesn’t mean a full fledged drought is about to make its presence known!

We will be having, starting next week, a wide range of plants including flowers, vegetables, fruit trees, blueberry bushes, grapes etc. Today we now have added potted White Pine to the Pawpaw and Redbud trees we had available at our stand yesterday.

The Eastern White Pine, isn’t only a prized tree for lumber, its delicate, soft green, graceful foliage is unsurpassed by that of any other hardy northern tree except possibly the hemlock.  In the fall it drops its three-year-old needles like many other evergreens, but the foliage that remains stays a soft green all winter.  In fact, the normal green of White Pine foliage year in and year out make this tree one of the most valuable for background foliage in any landscape planting, be it large or small

We are low on our supply of apples although we have a fair supply of Fuji,  We also have a fair supply of mixed eating and baking varieties. We also have our yellow onions for sale at $2.50 for a 1/4 peck (about 3 pounds) and our red potatoes for $3 a half peck (about 7 pounds)

Thursday, April 23, 2015 — Nicer weather ahead starting this afternoon!

Today we now have, in addition to Pawpaw trees, Redbud trees that we grew from seed. Redbuds are a beautiful native flowering tree that, like pawpaws, are native to southern Michigan. Also like Pawpaws, Redbuds are native to not only Michigan but to many southern states. I discovered, from experience, that many Redbuds that are sold in garden centers are of the southern strain and they are not hardy in Michigan and often die down to the ground nearly every winter. The Redbuds we sell were grown right here and survived the bitter cold 1994 winter which killed our peach trees and temperatures were reported down to -30F along the White River!

We are low on our supply of apples although we have a fair supply of Fuji,  We also a fair supply of mixed eating and baking varieties. We also have our yellow onions for sale at $2.50 for a 3 pound bag and our red potatoes for $3 a half peck (about 7 pounds)

The newly opened Red Chef Bakery located on Main Street in Fremont, recently purchased a good supply of our baking apples.  For more information on this new bakery you might want to check out their website at www.redchefbakery.com.

 

Wednesday, April 22, 2015 — a perfect day for apple pie!

This will likely be the chilliest day until November!  A perfect day to think about making apple pies and other apple goodies!  Luckily, we still have a good supply of apples that make delicious pies!

A couple days ago we baked a couple apple pies using a new favorite pie crust recipe.  The recipe is a unique one because it utilizes hard apple cider as the combining liquid which results in a very tender and flaky crust.  You can find the recipe below and step by step photos on my daughter Bernadette’s blog, Taste of SunSugar.

Pie

Apple Pie with Hard Apple Cider Crust that we baked up a couple days ago!

THE RECIPE:

Apple Pie with Hard Apple Cider Crust

Ingredients
Hard Apple Cider Pie Crust:
    • 2-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
    • 1 teaspoon salt
    • 2 tablespoons sugar
    • 1-1/2 sticks cold butter
    • 1/2 cup cold vegetable shortening
    • 1/4 cup cold water
    • Hard apple cider
Filling:
  • 6 medium to large apples of choice. I used Idared.
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
Instructions
  1. Combine flour, salt and sugar in a large mixing bowl. Cut up the butter into tablespoons and combine with flour mixture using pastry cutter. Add the shortening and combine using pastry cutter. Butter and flour mixture should resemble large curd cottage cheese.
  2. With the spoon or spatula combine the water with the dough mixture using a folding motion. Add healthy splash of hard apple cider, pressing down on the dough until it sticks together. Keep adding the apple cider until the dough is wet enough to form a ball. You can use your hands, but make sure not to overwork the dough or melt the butter with your hands.
  3. Divide dough into two pieces, roll into balls, flatten slightly and cover in plastic wrap. Place in freezer for about 45 min. I left my dough in there for the time it took me to prepare the filling.
  4. Peel, core, and chop the apples. I used an apple peeler for this job. I evenly distributed the sugar, lemon juice and cinnamon over the chopped apples. I set aside and began rolling out the dough.
  5. Preheat oven to 475°. I rolled out one disc of dough that was large enough to fit the 9-inch pie plate with a little over hang. Trim dough as needed.
  6. Dump the apples in and roll out the next ball of dough and place on top. Fold the overhanging dough over on itself and seal with fingers or fork. Use a knife or fork and pierce vent holes on the top of the dough.
  7. Bake pie until just golden brown. Remove and wash with egg whites or milk and then sprinkle sugar on top. Reduce oven temp to 350° and return pies to oven. Bake for an hour or until crust is a dark golden brown and apples are bubbling. Tip: Place a cookie sheet lined with aluminum foil underneath the pie to catch the dripping apple juices.

 

Today we have the following up for sale:

Many varieties of the apples we are selling are still nice and crisp. We have 1/2 peck roadside bags of apples for $3 and many varieties are also available in 1/2 bushels at $6. Varieties include: Delicious, Empire, Idared, Granny Smith, Jonagold, Splendor, Crispin/Mutsu, Blushing Golden and Fuji. We also have our yellow onions for sale at $2.50 for a 3 pound bag and our red potatoes for $3 a half peck (about 7 pounds)

Also, potted Pawpaw trees, $6 and up.

Here is some information on pawpaws that I wrote:

 

Close relatives of the pawpaw (Asimina triloba) all come from tropical or semi-tropical areas of the world.  Despite this, many pawpaws are quite hardy and strains which are native to the northern part of their range, from Nebraska through Michigan and into southwestern Ontario, seem to be able to withstand -25 F with ease. Strains from the deep south are not as hardy as this and will not survive most winters in Michigan.

            Pawpaws do not do well in areas that have low humidity, strong winds or cool marine climates.  They do best when planted in rich well drained soil in a location protected from wind.  Pawpaws are normally found in wooded areas and often form dense thickets.  While pawpaw trees which get the most sun usually produce the most fruit, when the trees are small they should be protected from intense sunlight.  Planting them about 6 to 12 feet from the north side of a house, garage or similar building seems to be an ideal location.  Here they are protected from the sun when small and as they grow they receive more and more sun which they need to produce abundant crops.  If you plant them in the open, provide some means of protecting them from the direct sun for at least the first  two years.  Often even a large lawn chair placed next to the south side of the little tree will do. 

            Normally, pawpaw trees usually don’t start bearing until they are at least 7 years old.  However, with lots of TLC and a near perfect location and good soil, you can get them to bear earlier.   Keep in mind that pawpaws require cross pollination to get good crops which means it is recommended that you should plant at least two pawpaw trees.

            For details on planting pawpaws and subsequent care follow the normal recommendations for planting any tree or shrub but here are a few tips.

 Tip 1: Don’t neglect to prune it after you plant it.  Pruning always seems to help any tree or shrub survive its first year.  This is especially important with pawpaws.   The heavier you prune after planting the better are the chances the tree will survive the first year.

Tip 2: Water frequently the first two years.  Make sure the soil never dries out, but don’t waterlog the soil if it is heavy.  With real sandy soil it is nearly impossible to over water.  Tip 3: Watering frequently, with a bit of soluble fertilizer such as Miracle-Gro or a Miracle Gro wannabee,  will likely get your pawpaw trees growing faster and bearing earlier.

            While ripe pawpaws will only keep a few days at room temperature, which is something like a banana, they will keep several weeks in a  refrigerator as long as its temperature is above 40F.  Regular bananas, of course, shouldn’t be kept refrigerated.

Note: To read my article that was in Grit magazine go to the URL: grit.com/garden/fruit/pawpaws.aspx

Tuesday, April 21, 2015 — What’s happening at Magicland Farms today.

Today looks to be cool and breezy with the possibility of a brief sprinkle. Although this weekend, including Friday, looks like it will be a tad cooler than normal, the bright sun should make it quite pleasant. It does look like we are going into another long dry spell, which isn’t always bad for this time of the year! Yesterday we started our nursery operation by making available our potted Pawpaw trees which we have grown from seed right here in Newaygo County. The prices for these hardy, Newaygo County grown pawpaw trees starts at $6 and up, depending upon size. Thursday we plan on putting out for sale redbud trees that we grew from seed. Redbuds are a beautiful native flowering tree that, like pawpaws, are native to southern Michigan. Also like pawpaws, redbuds are native to not only Michigan but to many southern states. I discovered, from experience, that many redbuds that are sold in garden centers are of the southern strain and they are not hardy in Michigan and often die down to the ground nearly every winter. The redbuds we sell were grown right here and survived the bitter cold 1994 winter which killed our peach trees and temperatures were reported down to -30F along the White River!

http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-photography-redbud-blooms-image21295037

A little later on we will also have several varieties of apple trees including Honeycrisp, Gala, Jonafree, Jonagold, and Liberty; Early Red Haven peach trees, hardy Wisconsin pecan seedlings from our own nuts grown right on our farm, blueberry bushes, red raspberries, rhubarb, and seedless and seeded grapes. Looking for herbs? We will be having a large selection of potted herbs this year including: Basil (green and purple), chives, sage, parsley, peppermint, summer savory, marjoram, cilantro, thyme, oregano, lavender, and rosemary. Flowering and landscape plants, both perennial and annual, will also be available including Hollyhocks, ferns, echinacea (purple coneflower), sempervivum, morning glory, stonecrop, nasturtium, mums, and many more! And yes, we will also be having vegetable plants including tomatoes, peppers, winter squash, summer squash, cucumbers, melons, pumpkins, and more. Make sure to keep coming back here for updates, keep an eye on our weekly Hi-Lites ad, and like our Facebook page. Also, visit my daughter’s new blog for more information about the all these plants and planting information: Taste of SunSugar.

 

Today we also have the following up for sale:

Many varieties of the apples we are selling are still nice and crisp. We have 1/2 peck roadside bags of apples for $3 and many varieties are also available in 1/2 bushels at $6. Varieties include: Delicious, Empire, Idared, Granny Smith, Jonagold, Splendor, Crispin/Mutsu, Blushing Golden and Fuji. We also have our yellow onions for sale at $2.50 for a 3 pound bag and our red potatoes for $3 a half peck (about 7 pounds)

Here is some information on pawpaws that I wrote:

 

Close relatives of the pawpaw (Asimina triloba) all come from tropical or semi-tropical areas of the world. Despite this, many pawpaws are quite hardy and strains which are native to the northern part of their range, from Nebraska through Michigan and into southwestern Ontario, seem to be able to withstand -25 F with ease. Strains from the deep south are not as hardy as this and will not survive most winters in Michigan. Pawpaws do not do well in areas that have low humidity, strong winds or cool marine climates. They do best when planted in rich well drained soil in a location protected from wind. Pawpaws are normally found in wooded areas and often form dense thickets. While pawpaw trees which get the most sun usually produce the most fruit, when the trees are small they should be protected from intense sunlight. Planting them about 6 to 12 feet from the north side of a house, garage or similar building seems to be an ideal location. Here they are protected from the sun when small and as they grow they receive more and more sun which they need to produce abundant crops. If you plant them in the open, provide some means of protecting them from the direct sun for at least the first two years. Often even a large lawn chair placed next to the south side of the little tree will do. Normally, pawpaw trees usually don’t start bearing until they are at least 7 years old. However, with lots of TLC and a near perfect location and good soil, you can get them to bear earlier. Keep in mind that pawpaws require cross pollination to get good crops which means it is recommended that you should plant at least two pawpaw trees. For details on planting pawpaws and subsequent care follow the normal recommendations for planting any tree or shrub but here are a few tips. Tip 1: Don’t neglect to prune it after you plant it. Pruning always seems to help any tree or shrub survive its first year. This is especially important with pawpaws. The heavier you prune after planting the better are the chances the tree will survive the first year. Tip 2: Water frequently the first two years. Make sure the soil never dries out, but don’t waterlog the soil if it is heavy. With real sandy soil it is nearly impossible to over water. Tip 3: Watering frequently, with a bit of soluble fertilizer such as Miracle-Gro or a Miracle Gro wannabee, will likely get your pawpaw trees growing faster and bearing earlier. While ripe pawpaws will only keep a few days at room temperature, which is something like a banana, they will keep several weeks in a refrigerator as long as its temperature is above 40F. Regular bananas, of course, shouldn’t be kept refrigerated.

Note: To read my article that was in Grit magazine go to the URL: grit.com/garden/fruit/pawpaws.aspx

Monday, April 20, 2015 — Pawpaw trees, apples, onions and potatoes for sale today!

Today we will be starting our nursery operation by making available our potted Pawpaw trees which we have grown from seed right here in Newaygo County. The prices for these hardy, Newaygo County grown pawpaw trees starts at $6 and up, depending upon size.  By the way, we received abut a half inch of much needed rain so far!

A little later on we will also have several varieties of apple trees including Honeycrisp, Gala, Jonafree, Jonagold, and Liberty; Early Red Haven peach trees, hardy Wisconsin pecan seedlings from our own nuts grown right on our farm, blueberry bushes, red raspberries, rhubarb, and seedless and seeded grapes. Looking for herbs? We will be having a large selection of potted herbs this year including: Basil (green and purple), chives, sage, parsley, peppermint, summer savory, marjoram, cilantro, thyme, oregano, lavender, and rosemary. Flowering and landscape plants, both perennial and annual, will also be available including Hollyhocks, ferns, echinacea (purple coneflower), sempervivum, morning glory, stonecrop, nasturtium, mums, and many more! And yes, we will also be having vegetable plants including tomatoes, peppers, winter squash, summer squash, cucumbers, melons, pumpkins, and more. Make sure to keep coming back here for updates, keep an eye on our weekly Hi-Lites ad, and like our Facebook page. Also, visit my daughter’s new blog for more information about the all these plants and planting information: Taste of SunSugar.

Today we also have the following up for sale:

Many varieties of the apples we are selling are still nice and crisp. We have 1/2 peck roadside bags of apples for $3 and many varieties are also available in 1/2 bushels at $6. Varieties include: Delicious, Empire, Idared, Granny Smith, Jonagold, Splendor, Crispin/Mutsu, Blushing Golden and Fuji.  We also have our yellow onions for sale at $2.50 for a 3 pound bag and our red potatoes for $3 a half peck (about 7 pounds)

Here is some information on pawpaws that I wrote:

 

Close relatives of the pawpaw (Asimina triloba) all come from tropical or semi-tropical areas of the world.  Despite this, many pawpaws are quite hardy and strains which are native to the northern part of their range, from Nebraska through Michigan and into southwestern Ontario, seem to be able to withstand -25 F with ease. Strains from the deep south are not as hardy as this and will not survive most winters in Michigan.

            Pawpaws do not do well in areas that have low humidity, strong winds or cool marine climates.  They do best when planted in rich well drained soil in a location protected from wind.  Pawpaws are normally found in wooded areas and often form dense thickets.  While pawpaw trees which get the most sun usually produce the most fruit, when the trees are small they should be protected from intense sunlight.  Planting them about 6 to 12 feet from the north side of a house, garage or similar building seems to be an ideal location.  Here they are protected from the sun when small and as they grow they receive more and more sun which they need to produce abundant crops.  If you plant them in the open, provide some means of protecting them from the direct sun for at least the first  two years.  Often even a large lawn chair placed next to the south side of the little tree will do. 

            Normally, pawpaw trees usually don’t start bearing until they are at least 7 years old.  However, with lots of TLC and a near perfect location and good soil, you can get them to bear earlier.   Keep in mind that pawpaws require cross pollination to get good crops which means it is recommended that you should plant at least two pawpaw trees.

            For details on planting pawpaws and subsequent care follow the normal recommendations for planting any tree or shrub but here are a few tips.

 Tip 1: Don’t neglect to prune it after you plant it.  Pruning always seems to help any tree or shrub survive its first year.  This is especially important with pawpaws.   The heavier you prune after planting the better are the chances the tree will survive the first year.

Tip 2: Water frequently the first two years.  Make sure the soil never dries out, but don’t waterlog the soil if it is heavy.  With real sandy soil it is nearly impossible to over water.  Tip 3: Watering frequently, with a bit of soluble fertilizer such as Miracle-Gro or a Miracle Gro wannabee,  will likely get your pawpaw trees growing faster and bearing earlier.

            While ripe pawpaws will only keep a few days at room temperature, which is something like a banana, they will keep several weeks in a  refrigerator as long as its temperature is above 40F.  Regular bananas, of course, shouldn’t be kept refrigerated.

Note: To read my article that was in Grit magazine go to the URL: grit.com/garden/fruit/pawpaws.aspx

 

Fire Alert Has Been issued for today!!!

Hazardous Weather Outlook

HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND RAPIDS MI 410 AM EDT SAT APR 18 2015 MIZ037>040-043>046-050>052-056>059-064>067-071>074-190745- MASON-LAKE-OSCEOLA-CLARE-OCEANA-NEWAYGO-MECOSTA-ISABELLA-MUSKEGON- MONTCALM-GRATIOT-OTTAWA-KENT-IONIA-CLINTON-ALLEGAN-BARRY-EATON- INGHAM-VAN BUREN-KALAMAZOO-CALHOUN-JACKSON- 410 AM EDT SAT APR 18 2015 THIS HAZARDOUS WEATHER OUTLOOK IS FOR PORTIONS OF SOUTHWEST LOWER MICHIGAN. .DAY ONE…TODAY AND TONIGHT A HIGH FIRE DANGER WILL EXIST THIS AFTERNOON DUE TO VERY DRY AND WARM CONDITIONS ALONG WITH GUSTY EAST WINDS OF UP TO 30 MPH. FIRES CAN SPREAD VERY QUICKLY UNDER THESE CONDITIONS.

Saturday, April 18, 2015 — Beautiful day today but don’t burn brush or leaves!

Again, today will be really nice with sunshine and temps pushing 70F.  However, it will be windy and the humidity will again be almost non-existent which means the increased risk of wildfires and I believe the DNR won’t give burning permits today because of this, but I am not sure.  A red flag warning (high wildfire risk) was issued for a part of Wisconsin and, if conditions warrant, this warning might be extended further east toward us later today.

Starting Monday we will be selling potted pawpaw trees that we grew ourselves.  Here is some information on pawpaws that I wrote:

Close relatives of the pawpaw (Asimina triloba) all come from tropical or semi-tropical areas of the world.  Despite this, many pawpaws are quite hardy and strains which are native to the northern part of their range, from Nebraska through Michigan and into southwestern Ontario, seem to be able to withstand -25 F with ease. Strains from the deep south are not as hardy as this and will not survive most winters in Michigan.

            Pawpaws do not do well in areas that have low humidity, strong winds or cool marine climates.  They do best when planted in rich well drained soil in a location protected from wind.  Pawpaws are normally found in wooded areas and often form dense thickets.  While pawpaw trees which get the most sun usually produce the most fruit, when the trees are small they should be protected from intense sunlight.  Planting them about 6 to 12 feet from the north side of a house, garage or similar building seems to be an ideal location.  Here they are protected from the sun when small and as they grow they receive more and more sun which they need to produce abundant crops.  If you plant them in the open, provide some means of protecting them from the direct sun for at least the first  two years.  Often even a large lawn chair placed next to the south side of the little tree will do. 

            Normally, pawpaw trees usually don’t start bearing until they are at least 7 years old.  However, with lots of TLC and a near perfect location and good soil, you can get them to bear earlier.   Keep in mind that pawpaws require cross pollination to get good crops which means it is recommended that you should plant at least two pawpaw trees.

            For details on planting pawpaws and subsequent care follow the normal recommendations for planting any tree or shrub but here are a few tips.

 Tip 1: Don’t neglect to prune it after you plant it.  Pruning always seems to help any tree or shrub survive its first year.  This is especially important with pawpaws.   The heavier you prune after planting the better are the chances the tree will survive the first year.

Tip 2: Water frequently the first two years.  Make sure the soil never dries out, but don’t waterlog the soil if it is heavy.  With real sandy soil it is nearly impossible to over water.  Tip 3: Watering frequently, with a bit of soluble fertilizer such as Miracle-Gro or a Miracle Gro wannabee,  will likely get your pawpaw trees growing faster and bearing earlier.

            While ripe pawpaws will only keep a few days at room temperature, which is something like a banana, they will keep several weeks in a  refrigerator as long as its temperature is above 40F.  Regular bananas, of course, shouldn’t be kept refrigerated.

Note: To read my article that was in Grit magazine go to the URL: grit.com/garden/fruit/pawpaws.aspx

 A little later on we will also have different varieties of apple trees including Honeycrisp, Gala, Jonafree, Jonagold, and Liberty; Early Red Haven peach trees, hardy Wisconsin pecan seedlings from our own nuts grown right on our farm, blueberry bushes, red raspberries, rhubarb, and seedless and seeded grapes. Looking for herbs? We will be having a large selection of potted herbs this year including: Basil (green and purple), chives, sage, parsley, peppermint, summer savory, marjoram, cilantro, thyme, oregano, lavender, and rosemary. Flowering and landscape plants, both perennial and annual, will also be available including Hollyhocks, ferns, echinacea (purple coneflower), sempervivum, morning glory, stonecrop, nasturtium, mums, and many more! And yes, we will also be having vegetable plants including tomatoes, peppers, winter squash, summer squash, cucumbers, melons, pumpkins, and more. Make sure to keep coming back here for updates, keep an eye on our weekly Hi-Lites ad, and like our Facebook page. Also, visit my daughter’s new blog for more information about the all these plants and planting information: Taste of SunSugar.

Today we have the following up for sale.

Many varieties of the apples we are selling are still nice and crisp. We have 1/2 peck roadside bags of apples for $3 and many varieties are also available in 1/2 bushels.  The prices for the 1/2 bushel of apples depends upon the variety. Half bushels of Red Delicious and Empire apples are $6 and 1/2 bushels of Idared, Granny Smith, Jonagold, Splendor, Crispin/Mutsu, Blushing Golden and Fuji apples are $8 a half bushel.  We also have our yellow onions for sale at $2.50 for a 3 pound bag and our red potatoes for $3 a half peck (about 7 pounds)

 

Friday, April 17, 2015 — A beautiful day to talk more about water

Today and tomorrow will be just beautiful with temperatures likely in the low 70s in the afternoon with sunshine and light winds.  The forecast next week is for cooler unsettled weather due to a pesky upper atmosphere low pressure area drifting slowly by.  Sometimes these can become annoying.  We will see…

Water is precious to everyone but many complain when it falls from the sky and interrupts their weekend plans.  However. during the summer many, many people search it out to have fun with — swimming, fishing, boating and just sitting next to it watching the waves come in.  In the winter many also search it out in its solid form — ice and snow–for skiing, snowmobiling, sledding, skating on and even simpler pursuits like making snowmen and having snowball fights!  When you are in the business of growing food, like we are, water becomes more than just something to enjoy–it is absolutely vital to the bottom line!  That is one reason why I write so much about the weather in my blog.  Yesterday early we had some rain–about two tenths of an inch–and it was much appreciated.  Happily, Magicland Farms, as well as our home on Pickerel Lake, are blessed by clean, sweet water that is available to anyone with a well.  This general area is also blessed by good tasting, healthy water in generous amounts.  In fact, the ground water quality has been recognized to be superior by one of the world’s largest food related companies: Nestle.  Nestle has located one of their major Ice Mountain water bottling plants just a short drive from the farm. We make use of some of this pure, clean well water at our farm.  To conserve water (and to save energy, in addition to water) we make generous use of miles of drip tape. With drip tape very little water is wasted by direct evaporation so most is used by the plants.  It also allows the use of smaller wells and pumps to do the same job.

I want to provide a heads up for the next few weeks.  This year we are greatly expanding our plants and nursery area.  See yesterday’s blog post for more information.  We will start early next week on selling pawpaw trees we potted and then slowly start making available many more plants.

Right now we have the following up for sale

Many varieties of the apples we are selling are still nice and crisp. We have 1/2 peck roadside bags of apples for $3 and many varieties are also available in 1/2 bushels.  The prices for the 1/2 bushel of apples depends upon the variety. Half bushels of Red Delicious and Empire apples are $6 and 1/2 bushels of Idared, Granny Smith, Jonagold, Splendor, Crispin/Mutsu, Blushing Golden and Fuji apples are $8 a half bushel.  We also have our yellow onions for sale at $2.50 for a 3 pound bag and our red potatoes for $3 a half peck (about 7 pounds)